Pipeline

CVXL – 0095

CVXL-0095 is a preventive treatment for dermatitis or mucositis, major adverse effects of the treatment of ENT cancers, digestive and urogenital system or breast. Our innovative formulation makes it possible to efficiently deliver, at the local level, an antioxidant that protects the cells from the aggression of radiation or chemotherapeutic agents. The concept has been proven in a preclinical model of oral mucositis induced by radiotherapy. It could become the first local treatment of these major complications that often lead to the cessation of anti-cancer treatment.

Radiation or chemotherapeutic agents induce oxidative stress in the cells, which causes the accumulation of free radicals and damage to DNA. DNA damage triggers a pro-inflammatory response at the tissue level. This local reaction results in lesions that often go as far as ulceration with a risk of increased bacterial infection. The discomfort and very often the pain felt by the patient, the inability to eat properly in the case of ENT cancers, usually ceases only after stopping the treatment, the time to allow the healing of damaged tissue. As a result, the entire anti-cancer strategy is at risk.

By tackling the early phase oxidative stress, CVXL-0095 should make it possible to limit both the frequency and the severity of the damages to the tissues.

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CVXL-0095 is at the preclinical stage.

1. Al-Dasooqi, N. et al. Emerging evidence on the pathobiology of mucositis. Support. Care Cancer 21, 2075–83 (2013).
2. Sonis, S. T. et al. Perspectives on cancer therapy-induced mucosal injury: pathogenesis, measurement, epidemiology, and consequences for patients. Cancer 100, 1995–2025 (2004).

MUCOSITIS AND DERMATITIS

 

Oral mucositis is destruction of the mucosa of the mouth, occurring in more than 80% of patients receiving radiotherapy for the treatment of head and neck cancers, and in 40 to 100% of patients receiving chemotherapy. Similar conditions are observed on the vaginal or anal mucosa in the treatment of urogenital cancers.

Dermatitis consist of damages to the upper layers of the skin, occurring in nearly 90% of patients receiving radiation for the treatment of breast cancer. The mechanisms of this reaction are comparable to those of mucositis.

The discomfort and very often the pain felt by the patient, the inability to eat properly in the case of ENT cancers, usually stops only after stopping the treatment, the time to allow the healing of damaged tissue. As a result, the entire anti-cancer strategy is at risk.

There is currently no approved drug, only prophylactic, hygiene or anti-inflammatory approaches are currently available but suffer from insufficient efficacy.

Preventive therapy that limits the onset and severity of these major adverse events is therefore highly anticipated. It would improve adherence to anti-cancer treatments, and thus increase the life expectancy of patients.